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Home / Tips / 30 Tips that Help You Become an In-Demand Freelance Writer…

30 Tips that Help You Become an In-Demand Freelance Writer…

"Transform your writing services into a dynamic business." – Stefanie Flaxman

You may or may not know that I haven’t always been Copyblogger’s editor.

For many years, I was a Copyblogger reader. I didn’t know Brian. I didn’t know Sonia.

But I pretended that I did. Of course I didn’t tell anyone that … I just received so much guidance from Copyblogger that helped me position my writing and editing services for success that it felt like I knew them.

Although it was just a website with content I read, Copyblogger supported my business journey.

I’m bringing this up today because I’m happy to pay it forward, if you will, and share a list of Copyblogger’s top 30 tips that help you become an in-demand freelance writer.

"Knowing the business of writing and content marketing gives you an advantage over other (directionless) writers." – Stefanie Flaxman

1. Start with the basics

The overhead to work as a freelance writer in the digital space is quite small compared to a brick-and-mortar business.

Get clear on the bare minimum you need to get started, which includes:

If you’re like me, you’ll also need a lot of Moleskine notebooks for ideas and drafting.

But see? Nothing too complicated.

2. Assess short-term and long-term goals

It’s fun and exciting to think about all the projects you have planned for your business.

But one of the most important skills you can build is the ability to focus on your current work and short-term goals that keep the current incarnation of your writing services running.

You don’t have to forget about your ambitions; you just have to prioritize your time properly.

That could look something like spending 90 percent of your time on your immediate responsibilities and 10 percent of your time working on that Next Big Project.

Because, remember, you’ll never get to your long-term goals if you don’t meet your short-term ones.

3. Create an order of operations

Once you’ve got a handle on your short-term and long-term goals, select an order for the tasks you need to accomplish.

What marketing projects will help you get your first clients?

If something sounds like a good idea, but you don’t have the time or budget for it yet, it’s a distraction from actually making money sooner rather than later.

During this process, you’ll narrow down your short-term and long-term goals even more. Swiftly move distractions to your “possibility list for the future,” when you’re in a better position to take them on.

4. Recognize that your skill set helps businesses

People often have a difficult time understanding how you make a living as a writer.

However, some might assume you write fiction. Perhaps they ask if you work in entertainment. That one is somewhat easy to grasp.

So, when you say that’s not the type of writing you do, confusion sets in — along with the notion that you probably just write as a hobby.

That obstacle can distort your self-image as a writer and perpetuate the false belief Alaura Weaver wrote about in How to Make a Living as a Writer When Creative Writing Isn’t Paying the Bills: “… because almost everyone can write words, anyone can be a writer.”

Amateurs don’t excel at good, strategic writing, and that’s what sets you apart. You think in terms of using your communication skills to help others clearly convey their messages.

5. Determine your prices

Many people don’t know where to begin when it comes to translating ideas in their minds into cohesive sentences and paragraphs.

Your professional writing services can become the answer to their needs.

Accordingly, you have to set your prices with confidence. And it doesn’t have to be an overwhelming process, either.

Learn the basics in 5 Stress-Free Steps for Pricing Your Services.

6. Demonstrate you’re dedicated to producing excellent work

Proof that supports your professional rates is a win-win.

You’ll communicate your dedication to your clients, so that you don’t feel like a sleazy marketer, and your clients will get a clear picture of what it’s like to do business with you.

A combination of content marketing and copywriting helps you achieve this one. More on both of those in upcoming tips.

7. Outline the details you consider when evaluating a new project

As a premium service provider, you won’t be able to accept every project someone proposes.

You have to be a good match for the job, and the work has to be a good match for you.

Gathering information about a project helps you decide if it’s the right fit for your business and also allows you to tailor your service — before a client has given you any money — in a way that justifies the rate you’ll charge in exchange for your exceptional work.

You’ll convey that you’re highly focused on your client’s business goals — and that you may have even given those goals more consideration than he has.

Some questions you might ask are:

  • Does the client have a budget for this project? If so, what is it?
  • What’s the client’s business goal?
  • How does this project fit into the client’s marketing strategy?
  • Does the client intend to make any alterations to the completed project (i.e., edits to the text)? Or, is there any subsequent work the client or other service providers will perform related to this project (i.e., formatting, graphic design)?
  • Is this a project that could lead to regular work (daily, weekly, monthly), or is this a one-time task?

8. Present a compelling proposal

After you’ve evaluated a project, outline what you will produce if the prospect chooses to hire you.

And, most importantly, provide details about how your services will help them achieve what they want.

When you present the benefits of your offer as well, you provide the information your prospect initially requested and potentially even spark excitement about your collaboration.

9. Set (and meet) your own deadline

If your client gives you a specific deadline, give yourself one that is even earlier than theirs.

The earlier the better — it gives you time to handle unexpected events that may arise in your business or life and still keep the promise you made to your client.

If your client is vague about a deadline, set a precise one for them based on the information you gather about their project. Then tell your client when the project will be completed and meet (or beat) the deadline.

10. Communicate that clients must agree to your terms of service and payment policy

Just as setting your prices doesn’t have to be stressful, having a terms of service and payment policy doesn’t have to be intimidating.

You could think of them as a “comprehensive frequently asked questions form” that your clients must review and agree to before working with you.

Some aspects will be standard for all clients and some you’ll customize each time.

Elements you might want to consider include:

  • A detailed description of the client’s goals for the project
  • How your service will specifically meet each goal
  • Your project deadline — the date and time you will return the completed project
  • The number of revisions included in your price
  • Payment method options and when payment is due
  • The best way for the client to contact you if they have a question
  • When and how the client will receive a payment transaction receipt
  • What will happen if the client cancels the work requested after payment has been made but before the project has been completed
  • The extra costs and consequences that will incur if the client has an additional request that goes beyond the terms outlined

Once a client agrees in writing, you have a work contract you can reference if confusion arises.

When you draft your first terms of service and payment policy, you don’t have to cover every possible scenario that could develop.

Rather, think of them as “living” documents you can update with:

  • Rules to prevent common problems
  • Additional details that help your clients understand your offerings
  • Processes that will make your workflows easier

Your business and future clients will both benefit from these types of revisions.

"Learn how to write words that work and teach people what they need to know to do business with you." – Jerod Morris

11. Think like a professional artist

All of the tips above cover business logistics, which are necessary for a sustainable writing career.

But let’s not forget that you’re an artist.

As Sonia has put it:

“Wise marketers embrace art as integral to what they do, as much as strategy and execution are.”

12. Embrace the art of copy

Since 2006, Copyblogger has existed in the intersection of persuasion (copywriting) and online community (blogging).

Copy … blogger.

Words that drive specific actions can transform blog posts, podcast episodes, and videos into business assets — for both your own business and your clients’ businesses.

13. Master your marketing voice

When you master your own marketing voice, it demonstrates to clients that you can help them with theirs.

Tomorrow on Copyblogger, you’ll get a tutorial on how to help your clients find their writing voices.

14. Identify your ideal client

Pinpointing your ideal client is the first step to attracting that type of company.

When freelance writers don’t specify who they want to work with, they often end up taking low-paying jobs or unfulfilling assignments.

But the real danger in that is believing that low-paying jobs or unfulfilling assignments are the only options for freelance writers.

If you want to work for companies with substantial budgets for creative work, you must speak to them directly in your marketing materials and appeal to their sensibilities.

15. Learn content marketing strategy

Strong writers make great content marketers because clear communication is essential when you deliver a company’s message.

Content marketing strategy helps you meet prospects where they are and guide them to where they want to go — all while positioning your business as the only reasonable choice for their needs.

16. Showcase your authority

Your own website that demonstrates your expertise and builds trust is the best place to show prospects what you have to offer them.

Sought-after freelance writers build their own audiences of prospects by consistently producing valuable content.

17. Choose content projects for your own business

Making progress on content projects for your own business while you work on client assignments is a smart idea.

Treat yourself like one of your clients and add recurring tasks to your schedule for marketing activities, such as producing an ebook or creating blog posts and podcast episodes.

Freelance writers who have overcome feast-and-famine periods know that you can’t ever put promoting your services on the back burner.

18. Contribute to publications your ideal clients read

One way to attract new prospects to your business is to write articles for publications your ideal clients read.

Prepare a landing page for new visitors to your site, so you give them a proper welcome to your content hub.

19. Craft copy that persuades people to hire you

Most writing services are going to look the same to prospects who need to hire a freelance writer. It’s your job to communicate the unique qualities you bring to the table.

Let’s look at an example from the mattress industry.

It’s difficult to find the right mattress — and most brands look roughly the same — so a mattress shopper might not know how to narrow down their choices.

The ad below (with more than 100 million views) for the Purple mattress brand uses multiple time-tested copywriting techniques — such as problem, agitate, solve — to stand out as a top option.

And don’t forget that a copywriter was paid to write the script for this video.